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>> according to a group of open government advocates, the obama administration's efforts and government transparency are mixed. the sunlight foundation held a forum on whether president obama lifted to his pledge to have the most open government in american history. this discussion is 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the kayseri committee and transparency event on transparency in the obama presidency. i am daniel schuman with the sunlight foundation. welcome. there are many meanings of transparency. i'm not going to get into all of them today, but i'm sure there will be many different aspects. their widely divergent opinions on the successes of the obama administration and i hope to explore some of those today. president obama made a number of promises when he was running for president. a number are still available on change.gov. during the course of the administration, new issues came up. everything from campaign finance disclosure to dealing with the lawsuit and others on visitors logs. there's been a lot of changes during the course of the administration. what i
in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage of government spending is more than its should be related to total gdp. if there is an easier for millet
is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of the country the people of the north and although we have implemented programs in the north unless there is a connection between the government and individuals, the programs are not going to have the effect of people feeling as though they are a part of society. and so, there was an effort planned over the last couple of years where the development partners in tandem with the government, the central government would deliver resources to the north again with a government out in the lead and with the donors supporting. unfortunately, the pace of that was too slow and not very effective. another point moving forward i think is that we do need to concentrate on decentralization and making a connection between the government services and the individual what the community level. >> to build further on the comments about the resource base within the mali clearly there are difficult choices for the government there that are involved in
of the burden of having to govern egypt. removing themselves from the political system is more in keeping with the history of the egypt armed forces since the 1967 defeat when they determined being a political army was not good for their organization and their ability to fight a war on the battlefield. >> when you look at the struggle, is it first of all essentially the islamist versus the secularist, and is it fair to say as everybody does the islamists have greater appeal, they're better organized, they're going to win this? >> i think it is, right now there are basically three groups here that are contending for the loyalties of the great undifferentiated mass of egyptian people. one group is the egyptians. the people you remember from tahrir square a couple years ago. the third group, the mubarak loyalists. during the revolution of 2011, it was the islamists and young revolution nar ees against the loyalists. now because they have been so heavy handed in the way they have governed the transitions it's now really the revolutionaries fighting them. it takes egypt significant step more t
. they said they would cut government spending. they said they would stop the construction of a multimillion-dollar dam, make expressways toll free. prime minister noda had to come out last month to apologize for all the broken promises. support for his party slumped under his watch. the dpj offered a confused response to the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis. noda oversaw the restart of nuclear reactors, and he embraced unpopular causes such as the hike in the consumption tax. opposition leaders have criticized the dpj for putting the alliance with the u.s. in danger by flip-flopping on relocating american bases. you know, opposition parties will be making these same arguments to voters. >> so how do you rate the opposition's chances of winning? >> mm-hmm. recent polls suggest that main opposition leader democrats could regain power. you know, leader shinzo abe has already served as a prime minister in 2006 and '07. he says he would not yield in territorial fight with china and would increase defense spending if necessary. at the same time, he said he would do more to mend economic ti
to continue to reduce demand. >> what role should the government play in the future -- your business is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security tr
-missile system to turkey; the massive protest against the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the borde
replaced by government propaganda. i had grown up readingern necessary hemmingway and poetry and now i had to face propaganda eight hours a day and i was 14 years old. what do you think when having fun becomes illegal? how political can a 14-year-old get? but you the 14-year-old becomes political. that was the basis of all the protests that began in iran as early as 1980. now, sharia law came into iran very early after the revolution, and under sharia law democracy and freedom of the citizen is impossible. the thing of sharia law that govern iran in 1979 and 1980 are still in place. they're have something cosmetic changes here and there depending on what administration is president of iran. if you wore nail polish you could get away with it. but does that really make a big difference? does that mean that iran becomes free and independent are in khamenei? no. under this constitution freedom and democracy in iran is impossible. i'm sure you all know about the american hostages. everybody knows about that. but just after those hostages were released, i was in prison in iran, and at the time w
, for exactly the reasons you just mentioned, because the government, you know, from the top down refuses to acknowledge this as terrorism, refuses to acknowledge the radical islamist angle, that he was communicating with a spiritual leader of al-qaeda before this attack happened, and because they still want to call it a workplace violence incident, they're unwilling to take all the necessary steps they would need to acknowledge that this guy's a traitor, killed our fellow members, and we're going the use every step possible. instead he's just a regular defendant on a murder trial, no islamic angle, and they're limited. megyn: well, you could make the argument that this will preserve the credibility of the verdict if it comes down guilty at the end of all these proceedings, that we bent over backward to protect this guy's rights as we do in our criminal justice system. pete, great to have you here. thanks so much for your perspective. >>> up next, a bombshell in the legal battle between the lawmakers in one state and their teachers' union. >>> plus, the woman best known for running "vogue
the field. >> john, there's a terrific bias in favor of government and i give you this example. when the debate about, whether to eliminate the mortgage interest deduction was being bandied about this week in washington, "the washington post" had this line, that would cost the government, the elimination of the mortgage deduction, 100 billion dollars a year. so, it's all about the government, what it costs the government. what about what it costs the taxpayers, the people who make give to these bozos to waste. >> i thought we were the government. >> exactly. >> i'm trying to figure out where cal is coming from. >> yeah. but the president, you know, was out in philadelphia on friday, and he seems to be sort of, continuing the campaign almost as if he didn't win the election and the media are playing-- >> again, look, there's no question the media are trying to push the republicans toward a deal although there's a significant backlash against it. look, the president is campaigning, he's campaigning, just like he's kept going, but it worked for him and before november 6th why should he
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
the infrastructure in syria in tact. by destroying the infrastructure the governance of that country we allow libya to slip into chaos. we not allow it to happen in syria. best course of action is for us to not do that sort of thing. encourage him to leave. have the russians help us. clearly we have got to maintain that country as a sovereign effective good country with governance in some form. >> we don't have enough time to go through the country. talk about the countries going to play a vital role in whether this is solved peacefully or a bad let's talk about iran. let's talk about russia and let's talk about egypt which one is the king pin in this whole mess? >> rush sharks -- russia, period for syria anyway. base where they have ships coming into. they vin influence over both countries as we know the russians have been helping the iranians. egypt not so much. egypt has its own problems. iranians we are already in their face so to speak. sanctions. issues with elm this. russia is the king pin here. they can do the most good and the most harm. frankly, now if the represents are used they will ho
, it will be difficult to convince the u.s. government to change the way it has done business over the last 30 years -- some of that is necessary. the task is, how do you play the right role of engaging here? it is not naively giving money to liberal groups and not having a strategy. i believe this is a significant task inside egypt. it is an encouraging sign -- this is my prediction, it is going to force islamist political parties, at least elements of it to change their ideology. if the system remains open, if there is a big debate, i did not see it going backwards in terms of the diversity in egypt. it is hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> we're going to move toward closing remarks. we will go in reverse order. bret you can have your two minutes. >> 1979, an influential article was written, dictatorships and double standards. he argued -- in a position of find myself increasingly attracted to -- the united states is better served secular authoritarian regimes against totalitarian alternatives. totalitarian alternatives, then as now, often becomes a power by means of democratic or pop
. the government didn't think it could distinguish between mortgage interest and other kinds of interest. less interest is deductible now. some of the things are left over from the early days of the tax code. there is no magic about allowing people to deduct mortgage interest and not the interest they pay on their credit cards. some of these things are hard to explain. host: does it incentivize home buying? guest: it does provide some if incentive for buying a home and is a large tax break and gives them an enormous benefits. it mostly provides an incentive for buying a bigger house. it seems to incentivize mcmansions. there is a fair question of whether that is something we should be spending that much money on. host: let's go to ohio, robert is a democrat. caller: yes, my question is this. a question/comment. i have seen all these outbreaks been giving out. supposedly they were created for an incentive for them to hire more people. they were given as four years and years. a majority of these companies did very little in hiring. they say they still need to do this. why should we continue givi
hates the government? maybe singing a little different tune today. >> it's because government's now telling them stop dreaming, stop striving. we'll take care of you. >> she gets the comedians laughing... >> that's hilarious! >> ...and the thinkers thinking. >> okay, so there's wiggle-room in the ten commandments is what you're telling me. >> she's joy behar. ... and current will let me say anything. >> only on current tv. >> cenk: the middle east is on fire, of course, what else is new, right? first we start in egypt where the new president has time to give himself unchecked powers with no oversight over his additions. tens of thousands of protestors marching on the palace. they've breached blockades barbed wire and it is a mess over there. they say this is the last stand and the last warning. over in syria the government is apparently moving its chemical weapons. now, of course is a red line for nato and the u.s. and even russia is concerned about this, saying if you use chemical weapons, then the international community will have to respond. already 40,000 dead in syria. >> in ir
this to a c.e.o. in the crowd. so maybe david, you could take this. what role should the government play in the future of -- your business is transportation, too -- in the transportation business with this? look, we are mired in conversations about a fiscal cliff on the very right now. we're talking about long-term infrastructure build-out, a long-term energy plan. what role should c.e.o.'s have and the federal government have in making sure this gets done? >> this is the perfect opportunity for the federal government and for state governments to work together to achieve a common goal, right? there's plenty of times where, when we run a business, our interests might not coalesce with the interests of either of the parties. as fred said, this is the opportunity that we have never had in this country before, where you can have consumer, the business and the governments all working together to take advantage of this huge resource, if you want to call it saudi america. from a waste management perspective, for us it makes so much sense, because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 equi
last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfa
will require islamists when exposed to the public, will force and to pay the heavy price of governing. in egypt we see that already. much in the same way that in the next couple of weeks in this town we will see some ideologues, see their ideology tested. grover norquist -- both ways. political forces, wherever their ideology is grounded, as long as the system remains open tand pluralistic, but will be forced -- we see this in indonesia. in 2002, the islamist parties got 41% of the vote. the decline over the last couple of years to about 29%. i believe we are in the early stages of transformation in the middle east. we will talk about that complex competition for power. a final point -- i hope we debated a little bit. it is the issue of u.s. policy. it is my view that two years into this transition in the middle east -- and i avoid calling it arab awakening or arab spring. it is too early to characterize it. we've only seen about four countries, senior leaderships' change. -- seen their leadership's change. how we actually change and adapt and become more nimble, both in terms of how we deal wi
>> "inside washington" is brought you in part by the american federation of government employees, proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. >> my hope is to get this done before christmas. >> no substantive progress has been made in talks between the white house and the house. >> this week on "inside washington," heading towards the fiscal cliff. who is going to blink first? >> nobody can win everything. the republicans will have to give on revenue, democrats will have to give on entitlement reform. >> susan rice still in the bull's-eye. >> the concerns i have are greater today than before. >> lunch at the white house whitemitt. who will dare to break the no tax hike pledge? >> republicans who voted against the no tax hike pledged damage the brand for everyone else. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> thomas jefferson said the purpose
, down the road an islamist-led government could use the constitution to deny them the right. they don't want to vote on this draft constitution. that's why they're out here protesting at this hour. >> reza, as always, appreciate your reporting from sicairo. >>> strong warning for syria's president not to use chemical weapons against his own people. nato secretary-general said the use of such weapons would result in an immediate reaction, his words. he described the syrian stockpiles as a matter of great concern and president obama has been warning of consequences if al assad makes what mr. obama calls the tragic mistake of using chemical weapons. former british prime minister tony blair voiced his concerns earlier on cnn. >> i mean now the death toll probably would be around 40,000, since this began, since a large number of people. but if there was any sense at all that assad was going to use chemical weapons or did use chemical weapons against his own people i expect a tough response that would be military. >> and nato is taking no chances by trying to protect one of its members, all
revenue for the government. >> well, a lot of people worry about the many years that japan has been in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white ho
, of course, had seized a number of military bases, government military bases and looted the weapons, taken the weapons from those to help arm their arsenals. rather than stay and occupy those bases, however, they've withdrawn knowing the syrian air force could attack those sites. so in recent weeks, the momentum seems to have swung the rebels' way, but right now analysts are very cautious in trying to predict what a tipping point could be for the fall of the regime overall. >> rose: and what happens if it falls? >> absolutely. and what steps next would we take. would assad retreat to the hills in an enclave of some sort, taking some of his chemical weapons with him? would there be some kind of political deal, some brokered deal to get him out of the country? right now many of these are some of the options that the u.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relat
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
the best politics is good governing and i think we need to see more focus on solving problems and getting things done in washington than playing politics. i think to recognize there's been real progress made, right the border is safer today, the immigration system is better, the two parties worked together to do that over the last few years. there are still some meaningful things that need to get done. the d.r.e.a.m. act, we have to fix the low-end and high-end visa system. the mexicans are going to do a whole boar border system. i think there will be a lot of room to work together next year to get something meaningful done. if the republicans are earnest and play it straight i think they'll get a lot of credit for working with the democrats to fix the broken immigration system and making it better. jon: getting something meaningful done, it seems like a longtime since that's happened in washington. we'll look forward to it. simon rosenberg. kate obenshane thank you much. jenna: the nato alliance warning the assad regime in syria against using chemical weapons against his own people. this
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> yeah. that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative ellison, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. i'm a father too. melissa: congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give. the money they have have is my money that they have taken from me. it is company's money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. >> it is our money. melissa: hanging on to earnings, these are deductions rather than sending in even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money. that is exxon's money it is hanging on to. but they're not taking money back. they're hanging onto the money they have earned. do you und
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
government if it is not paid out? once you open up a claim, just because you have got to clean open, you have $4,000 in your account -- massachusetts, you might have $15,000 in your account. that money, if you do not dried out, the state keeps it, i believe. -- draw it out, the state keeps it, i believe. guest: i am not sure how that would be handled. the difference between what is happening in the state fund, which is state-funded, and the federal reimbursement, i believe the federal reimbursement only goes to the states after they pick up the money. guest: that is my understanding as well. i did nothing states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemployment. -- do not think states are able to keep money that is not disbursed to the unemploymed. -- unemployed. host: for you, mr. tanner, who is better at running these programs, the state governments or federal governments? guest: states have very different economic climates. what is going on the dakotas right now, they're not even eligible for this emergency unemployment extended benefits, versus new york, which has the highe
the syrian government uses often to describe the rebels fighting against the government which is killing its own people. activists say the government has killed more than 40,000 people, or at least 40,000 have died in the civil war which broke out well more than a year ago. we have team fox coverage. now to the state department with reaction from the united states and nato. first to the chief fox correspondent at the united nations this afternoon. it seems there is a battle for a capital city that could be shaping up and that is crucially important. >>jonathan: yes. there is no doubt we have entered a new and very significant stage in the battle for syria and that is in essence of battle for the capital of damascus which has been going on for five or six days. president bashar al-assad wants do and indeed has to hang on to the capital if he is to stay in power. there are many experts who believe either way, he has decided to fight to the death. either if he tries to flow he will be killed by his own supporters who will feel betrayed him him or ultimately he will be killed by the rebels. this
fears that the government may unleash deadly chemical weapons on its own people. that means more lives could be lost, and for americans it means that the u.s. would probably take action. president obama, secretary of state clinton and defense secretary leon panetta have warned president bashar al assad that using chemical weapons crosses the red line. >> the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> so the question is what would that action look like? cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr has a look. >> reporter: randi, for defense secretary leon panetta, the major priority now is to try to determine syria's intent. does it intend to use chemical weapons? with the u.s. now believing the syrian government has chemical weapon-filled bombs, cnn has learned the pentagon is secretly updating military strike options for president obama in the event he orders action. a senior u.s. official tells cnn a strike could be carried out with the ships and aircraft already stationed in the region. the planning is being driven by the latest intelligence
in damascus. government forces have blamed rebels for the attack. nato has approved a request by turkey for the deployment of patriot missiles to its border with syria. turkey sought the missiles to defend itself from cross border violence. speaking in belgium, anders fogh rasmussen says the patriot missiles would serve as a deterrent to syria. >> i do believe that a deployment of patriot missiles will serve as an effective deterrent, and that way the escalate this situation along the syrian-turkish border. the mere fact that the patriot missiles have been deployed make it necessary for any potential aggressor to think twice before they even consider attacking turkey. >> the palestinian authority is urging the united nations and other actors to hold israel accountable for its recent expansion in the west bank. israel has announced plans to build 3000 new settlement homes and expand the e1 settlement the which splits the west bank in two in response to last week's vote at the united nations. palestinian president mahmoud abbas says the security council should pressure israel to stop expa
to the regime since 2009 when the iranian government was caught off guard and saw the large presence on the internet and getting information from outside of the country and sending information from inside out. it was the twitter rev -- revolution. they were using youtube and blog citizen journalist . this is the dialogue and communication that the government wants to control. so on - >> gretchen: so they are putting satellite blockers. >> it is working. every time there is an obstacle in place they are fining ways to work around it they are technological savvy. three-quarters of the country is under the age of 35. this is not someone they can suppress for too much time . the message to the west and united states in particular, is that this is the achilles heel of the government in iran. they want to protect their existence and they feel vulnerable . they will go to any ends to stop this flow of information. >> gretchen: what should westerners be aware of? is there anything can do? >> support the iranian people in terms of the programs. in the 2009 uprising, there were independent com
to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe am harm our economy. >> one conservative in the senate is breaking ranks with his party over the whole idea of raising tax rates with the party. tom coburn told msnbc today he would be okay with doing what the president wants, raising taxes on the wealthy, as long as it is coupled with entitlement reform and spending cuts. the reason we're told is because he believes at this point it's better to do that to get what he and other republicans want long term, which is a fundamental overhaul of the tax code, perhaps they can get that if they give the president what he wants now. you remember, coburn was among the first republicans a couple years ago to say it was okay to raise revenue. now he appears to be the first senate republican to say he would be okay with raising rates as long as it's part of that package we described. >> a meeting or a phone call between john boehner and president obama, is that at all in the works? >> as far as we know, no. whether it's in the works, we could only hope, at this point we do not have any i
republicans hate government and that's why they don't run it very well. >> but they hate government so that's why they don't run it very well. >> right. >> bill press said you can't be in washington without giving you opinion about whether or not we're going off the fiscal cliff, blah, blah blah. and i said the democrats tend to be the responsible party in terms of wanting to govern and then bill says because they hate it, and i say right. why would you make some big operate well that you don't like. >> you are a couple of marksists. >> what did reagan say? the government is the problem. >> right. they don't like the government. >> and i don't suppose the government is anything anybody would ever want to strangle in the bathtub. >> stephanie: no. all right. let's dive in to right-wing world. [♪ circus music ♪] >> stephanie: all right. rush limbaugh. >> folks i'm a little worn-out fed up and very inpatient with these ongoing assaults on the people who work in this country. the current disaster is not teaching people a lesson, nothing will. we're not teaching people to be
to come together to the two branches of government to rebuild our differences for the betterment of all. one thing about every single member of congress that raise their hand and support the constitution of the united states, just going to in a very simplified way read the preamble which says it all if we are to remove the uncertainty that this great republic can and will govern itself and in that way held the world. we have to go back to this. we would form a more perfect union and a stylish justice and so forth, tranquility, provide for the defense. that's what we are talking about. providing for the common defense in a carefully measured way. and second, promote the general welfare. it's not just the welfare of the head of his or the have nots. it's the general welfare of all citizens of this country. and secure the blessings of liberty under the constitution. members ought to simply read that and say to themselves what can i do? while our press release says they should communicate with the people. but i would like to pose a challenge because here is some of it, and i thank each of y
is going to be done down the road by the government. i don't know anyone who would ever believe such a promise. i don't expect that the republicans would accept that offer from the president. i just don't see that as ever happening in the city. let me ask you -- >> i'm sorry. republicans basically have to say our principles here are correct. our whole analysis of the economy is correct. we need massive spending decreases, and they've got to stick with that. if they can get decent spending increases and have to agree to additional revenue, fine. if they get pushed in the position the president is trying to push them, they stick with their principles, you know, and a year and a half from now go to the electorate with that. it worked in 10. it will probably work in 14. it will be a shame because it will do a lot of damage to our economy in between, but the president has that really on his shoulders. he's the leader. >> greta: mayor, thank you, sir. >> thank you. >> greta: breaking news out of syria. the syrian government mixing components for the deadly sarin nerve gas. the ranking
self-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and to working with him at the heritage foundation to see what we can do to improve the fate of our country so we will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has be
it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're addressing some of these large issues here locally. particularly a recently announced demonstration of integrating care for coverage for the dual eligible. the dual eligible or individuals covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but dual eligible operation represents 20% of the medicare population today and 31% of the cost. with excited to be part of this program under the strategic partnership with the company in dayton called care stories will be serving beneficiaries in cleveland and akron and youngstown. our partnership with care stories our ability and also appliquÉd conditions and their experiences being the leader in serving underprivileged people in health care for the last 23 years. it is this type of partnership designed to integrate care and simplify the health care experience
. where are we going to get it? coming from the government, everybody thinks that are entitled to something. thank you for the call. the top solution is to break the congressional gridlock. north dakota on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. the number one priority is bringing jobs home from china. host: you are on the air. go ahead, roger. caller: these people that sold our country out, they need to be exiled to themselves. host: good morning on the independent line. what is the number-one priority as the president embarks on a second term? caller: the issue a want to talk about this morning is one both sides agree with. everybody agrees but the tax code needs to be reformed, simplified. it needs to be changed in a permanent way where businessmen and individuals can plan for the future. there are multiple ways to do this, cut in reductions, giving everybody a fair chance to the tax code. i think it will really chance the economy. put it on a solid basis for businesses to plan and go into the future with. host: what do you think the president's number one priority should
of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank
christmas and new year's. they do understand how serious this is. that's what they're elect to do, govern, e. jon: matt, what i've seen own sunday shows both sides are hardening. >> i worked for a president who faced challenges when he went into his re-election with hurricane katrina. what can happen at beginning of second term, we saw this with ronald reagan, we've seen it with so many presidents, their second terms seem to be a little bit of disappointment, don't live up to what they accomplish in the first term. one of the problems with president obama he rolled out of this election thinking he won the election, he can can set the terms of conversation. he needs to remember the republicans control the house of representatives. they understand their political fate is tied to working with the president and being bipartisan. there are certain things they >> first of all, let me say that republicans and democrats have to stop drawing lines in the sand. they have to get in a room and talk to each other. we'll have to make difficult decisions. we have to increase revenue and we have to reduce g
's not ours? >> yeah, you know, that seems like a pretty narrow claim. it's not the u.s. government saying we have no drones. it's the navy. so all that means is that the navy wasn't involved potentially. there are other countries that have u.s. drones. there are other agencies within the u.s. government that use drones. so i think that's a fairly narrow denial, and, listen, i don't buy a lot of what i hear and read on iranian -- in the iranian state media. some of it is pretty crazy stuff. on the other hand, it's perfectly plausible this has happened. it's happened at least twice before. in october iran tried to shoot down a drone. they captured a cia drone about a year ago. one of the lessons here, one of the things the viewers should conclude from this is iran is the most watched country in the world. the u.s. has satellite intelligence, drone intelligence, human intelligence. israel, saudi arabia, russia, everyone watches iran, and that's an important conclusion to keep in mind. >> so, jim, if it isn't, in fact, our drone and our story is the truth, it's clearly a mystery to us as well wh
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